Dare to Run, Inc.

501 (c) 3 Not for Profit Organization

2520 Batchelder Street

Brooklyn NY 11235

917-923-4657

 

info@daretorun.org

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*All contributions to the organization are tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.  

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WOMEN

IN POLITICAL

LEADERSHIP

Women have come a long way in political leadership very quickly. Since 1971, the number of women serving in state legislatures has more than quintupled, and more women are expressing interest in running than every before. But women are still vastly underrepresented at the federal and state level. The reasons why range from limited recruitment to family obligations to self-doubt, and the repercussions of their lack of representation are felt across policy decisions that affect all levels of government. 

A SNAPSHOT

WHY WOMEN DON'T RUN

Imposter Syndrome

Lack of Support

AT THE FEDERAL LEVEL

Women hold 127 of the 535 seats in the 116th U.S. Congress

Women hold 25 of the 100 seats in the Senate

Women hold 102 of the 435 seats in the House of Representatives. Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), who was the first woman Speaker of the House, resumes her role as Speaker of the House.

AND WHY THEY SHOULD

RECOMMENDED RESOURCES

The Research

Lack of Recruitment

Fear of Sexism

Women are more likely to see themselves as unqualified. Even when they're equally or more qualified than comparable men, who do believe they're qualified.

Women are less likely to be approached than men to run for office. 

The support networks that provide introductions, funding, and endorsements are often closed to new faces and new kinds of faces.

Women frequently cite wanting to avoid the treatment they see of female candidates on a national stage.

Study after study shows that women are more likely to reach across the aisle, are embroiled in far fewer corruption scandals and introduce more, bolder proposals.

New perspectives in office means new ideas, especially around issues affecting women and families, and women introduce more new legislation generally than men.

Women who do run win just as often as as male candidates, at all levels of government

New Ideas

More Collaboration, Less Corruption, and Bolder Proposals

Women Are Just as Likely to Win

AT THE STATE LEVEL

Women hold 75 of 312 elective executive offices across the country. Among these women, 32 are Democrats, 42 are Republicans and 1 is non-partisan

1,840 of the 7,383 state legislators in the United States are women.

Women hold  1,398 of the 5,411 state house seats. 

Women hold 442 of the 1,972 state senate seats.

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